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Development Economy Environment Technology

Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement (Dr Ariyaratne)

The Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement is the largest people’s organization in Sri Lanka. Sarvodaya is Sanskrit for ‘Awakening of All’ and Shramadana means to donate effort. It began in one village and has grown to more than 15,000. Dr. A. T. Ariyaratne, the founder-president of Sarvodaya Shramadana Movement speaks about the ideologies behind the movement.

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Development Economy Environment Technology

Farmers autonomy and winning the battle against poverty (Periyapatna Satheesh)

A very interesting interview (28 minutes) with Periyapatna V. Satheesh, director of the Deccan Development Society commenting on: Farmers autonomy, Defeating hunger, Food security, Hope for a better life, Desperation in search of better agricultural methods, Exhaustion of mother earth, Lost relations between crops and pests, Winning the battle against poverty…

Some of the footage is used in A new future for small farmers. Produced and directed by Paul Enkelaar, Jan Paul Smit and Manuel Reichert.

Categories
Development Technology

Misplaced euphoria over the revolutionary role of social media (Evgeny Morozov)

Social media is praised as the new weapon for toppling dictatorial power structures. Morozov states that this euphoria is nothing more than a mirage (VPRO Backlight). (Sorry for some missing subtitles. Most of the show is in English.)

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Development

The meaning of Human Rights (Costas Douzinas)

A few minutes on the meaning and contradictions of the concept of human rights according to Costas Douzinas (a extract from The Burning Issue Lectures, supported by the LSE Annual Fund and Cato Stonex).

Categories
Development Economy

China’s data on inequality unreliable (NTD)

The gap between rich and poor in China (measured as GINI coefficient) is reaching unacceptable levels (see also Wealth Gap Rising Sharply in China (LinkAsia)). But let’s not single out China. This is also happening in India, many OECD countries and globally, for example: The 99.99% versus the 0.01% (The Guardian).

Categories
Development Economy

Is this the future of ‘aid’? (Great scene from Time Bandits)

Many governments are seeking to make ‘aid’ benefit their own private sectors. Do they risk harking back to the dark days of tied aid, when countries were forced to buy certain goods and services in exchange for ‘aid’ money?

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Development Economy

Michael Manley on Third World issues (Like It Is, 1977)

Interesting interview with Michael Manley (1924-1997), Jamaican politician who served three terms as prime minister of Jamaica (1972–1980 and 1989–1992) and a powerful champion of Third World issues. His defence of sovereignty for ex-colonial countries made him an outstanding figure in world politics. Interviewed by Gil Noble in 1977.

Categories
Development Environment Technology

Arsenic Mitigation and Social Mobilisation in Bangladesh (AMRF)

This is a short 8-minutes version of a 60-minutes documentary Development in Bad Waters (AMRF). In Bangladesh, millions of rural poor are currently drinking water that is contaminated with high levels of arsenic. Although the problem was described as the worst mass poisoning in history, little has been achieved to resolve it. Among the few projects that are being implemented, even fewer have managed to reach the poor and to implement water supplies and health support provisions that last. The Arsenic Mitigation and Research Foundation has implemented an integrated and participatory program that links research with project activities in a manner that reflects the priorities of local communities.

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Own production

Development in Bad Waters

Many of us still don’t know the difference between charity and development. While the total amount of foreign aid to Bangladesh since its independence is nearing $50 billion, the income gap has continued to increase. The inequalities persist in a range of human living conditions, not just in a financial sense. This film is concerned with some of those living conditions, starting with health, access to nutritious food and to safe and reliable drinking water. These are matters of grave urgency since the discovery of arsenic in the water almost two decades ago. The film explores the many failures to reach marginalised people and communities as a whole.

Details
Duration: 61 minutes
(Post-)Production: Crelis Rammelt.
Camera: Anton Rammelt, John Merson, Crelis Rammelt.
Post-production supervision: Arno Beekman, RGBAZ.
Music: flute and tabla (Bruce Miller) / CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
With thanks to the generous support of our sponsors.
Prepared in collaboration with the Institute of Environmental Studies at the University of New South Wales.

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Categories
Development Economy

Extremely ridiculous extreme poverty lines (WFP)

In a previous video post, we discussed uncertainty in World Bank data and methodology measuring extreme poverty (see What is happening to poverty? (Rammelt and Surace)). The Bank (and the UN) overestimate progress towards reaching the first Millennium Development Goal of halving extreme poverty. In our video, we made the point that the $1, $1.25 or $2 poverty lines are extremely low (especially considering the rise in food prices). Here is a simple illustration of this point. Melese Awok, World Food Programme Public Information Officer in Ethiopia, finds out what he can buy for a dollar at a food market in Addis Ababa.

Note that Melese is using the official exchange rate ($1 = Br16 in 2011, when the video was made). However, $1 buys a lot more in Ethiopia than it does in the US. For the purposes of comparing international poverty levels, this difference in purchasing power has been accounted for in World Bank estimates of global poverty (We explain this in our video, and in our article for AIDWATCH here). In 2011, $1 adjusted to purchasing power in Ethiopia was not Br16, but less then Br6 a day (see conversion factors here). Melese should have asked: “what can I buy for $0.37?”